Digital Handbook


About the Digital Handbook

About the Digital Handbook

ABOUT THE STLP HANDBOOK:

This digital document is intended to exist as a living document.  Any necessary regular updates to the document will be included and posted with a version number to indicate how current the document is and what the latest updates include.

It is no longer recommended to PRINT the STLP Handbook.  While updates will be posted only when necessary, a printed version could easily be rendered “out of date”, causing confusion.

Use this online version as your primary reference point.  

In an ongoing effort to reduce the size of the Handbook, much information that was originally posted in the document are being moved to the various subject categories of the STLP website.

 

Version History: 

  • August 12, 2014 – Initial Release
  • September 15, 2014 – Added Information for State Championship
  • October 1, 2014 – Updated Fall Showcase Registration Deadline, linked to registration, added WKU Showcase date
  • October 13, 2014 – Fixed link error in Fall Showcase Service Rubrics for Engineer Rubric
  • October 14, 2014 – Digital Product Online Judging info and rubrics updated
  • November 29, 2014 – Award nomination info and procedures updated
  • December 23, 2014 – State Championship info and rubrics updated
  • January 26, 2015 – Error correction to “What is Expected from Judges” section
  • January 28, 2015 – addition of Titanium/Platinum district list
  • March 13, 2015 – added additional links pointing to Project Planner/Rubric packet (editable)
  • July 30, 2015 – updates to replace “Fall Showcase” terminology to “Regional” wordage
  • August 26, 2015 – updated Regional rubrics linked, 2015-2016 Calendar error edited
  • October 9, 2015 – updated to include WKU Regional date
  • October 14, 2015 – Regional Service Category descriptions updated
  • December 12, 2015 – Inclusion of new DPOJ rubric for KnowHow2Pay PSA Challenge
  • December 16, 2015 – DPOJ rubrics minor updates/corrections, Updated STLP Calendar

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STLP Basic Info

What is STLP?

The Kentucky Department of Education’s Student Technology Leadership Program (STLP) uses project-based learning principles to empower student learning and achievement through the utilization (and creation) of technology based solutions to school and community needs.

 

Student create projects, products or services to meet those needs and then demonstrate their process and learning via various STLP categories.  Categories range from instructional, technical or community service based projects to digital content creation (digital art, photography, design, programming, app development, robotics, etc.)  to technical services (student help desk, network engineering, wireless deployments, etc.).  The best projects, products and services are invited to compete at the STLP State Championship each spring — and event which drew ~7000 participants in 2014.

 

STLP taps into the students’ interest and challenges/motivates them to explore new ways of learning and helping their school/community.  State sponsored events highlight the creative, logical, and often entrepreneurial, talents of students across the state.  In short, STLP provides a means for students to design, make, collaborate and learn through the general medium of technology and provides a platform for those 21st century college and career skills to be demonstrated.

 

STLP is open to all students K-12 across Kentucky.

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Five Levels of STLP Involvement

Students have many opportunities to be involved with STLP. These levels of involvement help the STLP schools reach higher levels of learning and collaboration.

School Level

The foundation and most important area for STLP is the school level.

Schools decide what projects, products and services the group will offer the school and community. These day-to- day, week-to-week activities/projects allow students to gain technology and leadership skills.

District Level

Many districts plan for events that bring all schools together. These events may be a district showcase, STLP awards or a learning camp. The district showcase of student technology skills allows parents and community persons to witness the empowered and talented students.

Some districts have a district team of students, which are students representing each school in the district. The district level STLP group helps plan and advise district STLP events or may carry out district projects.  These students may be part of a district help desk, as well.

Some STLP present at the school board to share what they are doing in STLP.

Regional Showcase Level

Local universities plan events that are unique to the college.  These events held on a campus allow students a chance to witness college life and plan for future post-secondary education. Students come to the event to compete in two categories: showcase projects and engineers.

University partners for past events: Murray State, Western, Eastern, UL, UK, Morehead, Thomas More, Hazard Community College, Northern Kentucky and Georgetown.

In some areas of the state, showcases are at a center or convention center, due to large numbers participating, or sponsorships of the event.

State Level

Invited STLP Engineers will provide tech support to endorsed STLP events.

Schools across Kentucky are invited to participate in the annual STLP State Championship. The best projects, products and performance categories are competing to be selected as the Best in State. Guest speakers, the technology playground and the annual awards program are highlights of this event.

Some schools might attend and/or present at a state conference and represent STLP.

National Level

  • Showcase projects, which are selected as the Best in State, may be invited to present at the student showcase at ISTE in 2015. The schools would be representing Kentucky on the national level.  (More info about ISTE: https://www.isteconference.org/2015/ )
  • Engineers may also be invited to ISTE 2015.
  • Some schools might attend and/or present at a national conference and represent STLP.

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STLP is Products

(AT WINTER VIRTUAL JUDGING & INVITED TO STATE CHAMPIONSHIP)

 STLP is projects, products and services.  STLP students regularly create professional products for the classroom, school and community.

Products must be entirely original and created by the student. The best products are ones that are used for STLP projects and services, the classroom for learning, or in the community.

Some products are a result of an authentic task and have strong purpose and audience.

Products may be utilize a “flipped” learning scenario, where products are created after school or at home.  However, it is important for the Coordinator to work with the student, teacher and parent to  verify the originality of the work.

Product are generally digital in nature and are separated into categories for the purposes of judging.  Entering your product in the correct category is supremely important.  Check the category to determine if the product is an individuals or teams production.

Local teachers and community persons may guide the student in learning about creating products.

STLP Products can be submitted for online judging in January each year.  Selected products will move on to compete at the STLP State Championship.

Schools decide the two best products to submit for winter Digital Product Online Judging. The school will register the products on line and provide an online web link to the product.  The validity of that link is essential to the judging process.  Broken links, incorrect links, or links that lead to a site that is behind a password/log-in portal (and therefore inaccessible) will not be scored by the judges.  It is IMPORTANT that every link we certified as correct by the Coordinator from an internet connection outside of your district BEFORE submitting the links via the online registration portal.

Each STLP that submits a Digital Product for judging online will also need to submit a certified judge to help score work online. Schools post products online at a site of their choice. Online judges, using a rubric, will decide the best product among a group of 6-10 titles. Online judging will continue until there are 8 pieces to bring to state in elementary, middle and high level in each category.

The rubric should guide the teacher in the process. The student should be given a copy of the rubric while developing the product in order to understand what details online judges will be looking for while scoring a piece.  Judges are asked to return comments about student products.   Results will be sent electronically to STLP Coordinators after all judging is completed.

Note: online judges will not score Products submitted by their own school.

POSTING PRODUCTS ONLINE FOR JUDGING

Schools need to select a site of choice to post the product and information requested by the rubric.  It is vital that links to products be checked and verified for accuracy prior to completing the registration process.  All links should be checked from an internet connection from outside your district, also.  This will help you recognize if links work outside of school and outside of any password protected online areas you had not considered.  Remember, online judges could be community members, retired teachers, experts in the field, etc. who are not inside your local network at school.

NOTICE: If links do not work, products will not be scored.  It is the responsibility of the STLP Coordinator to make certain all links are valid prior to the registration deadline.

All work needs to be original. Original means the student/team created the work.

All products need to have a unique title.

In order to be scored, a product needs to be located so the judge only has one or two clicks to find the title.

The rubric has specific requirements. The requirements need to be listed with the title of the piece online so judges can find the information readily.

Use the checklists listed on each rubric.

A title must be posted for each product and the URL listed when registering online.

Judges will search by the URL and title listed. The judge will not spend extra time searching.

NOTICE: rubrics for each Product will be reviewed annually and updated online 

INDIVIDUAL PRODUCT SUBMISSIONS

Digital Art: one student creates original digital art

Gazette Reporter Service: one student posts a story about Fall Showcase for a Gazette position at State (student will need to attend Fall Showcase to collect information needed to write their piece.  There is not a specific category for Gazette Reporter Service in the Fall Showcase registration portal.  Instead, students interested in Gazette Reporter Service should simply attend along with their STLP team)

Graphic Design: one student creates graphic design piece

KSU GIS/Maps/Cartography: one team creates a digital map

Manipulated Image: one student takes an original photo, manipulates it into a totally new image and posts both

Multimedia: one student uses three types of digital media to teach a concept

Music: one student creates an original digital music piece

Photo: onestudent takes an original image

Poster: onestudent creates an original digital poster

Storytelling: onestudent writes an original story

Technical Writing: onestudent creates a technical piece

 

INDIVIDUAL OR UP TO TWO STUDENTS

Presenter Service: 1-2students submit a 2 minute presentation video, slides & resume for a session at State

 

TEAM ONLY (Team can be 1 or more students)

Documentary: one team creates an original documentary video using new footage

ePublishing/Publishing: one team creates a product used by a class, school or the community

Feature: one team creates a video using new footage

KATE: Patriots Among Us 

PSA: one team creates a PSA video (15, 30 or 60 sec.)

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STLP Is Projects

STLP’s foundation is student created projects, products and services. Projects are presented at Regional Qualifiers (see Dates) with the hope of being invited to State Championship.  Here are some basics concepts regarding STLP Projects to help guide development with your students:

Schools design projects to accomplish the Mission and 6 Goals

Projects can be short or long term. Some projects may continue year after year.
At times, projects can morph into a service. The school’s project is so constant and expected that it becomes a service to the school over time.
The project supports the school and community in the use of technology, helps others learn with the use of technology or solves local or global issues.
Projects developed by the STLP members will be stronger when projects are:

      • Related to a need in the building and/or community
      • Carried out by the students over time with adult guidance
      • Engaging and challenging to students
      • Centered around critical thinking and problem solving
      • Student interest or emerging technology topics
      • Reinforced by school and the community and are part of the school culture
      • Centered around the STLP Mission and Goals
      • Demonstrated by students and allow for tech standards to grow
      • Partnered across grades, schools, communities (local, state, national and global)

Groups may apply online by the deadline for the showcase project category to be registered as a participant for a Regional Qualifier.  Walk-on projects will not be accepted as last-minute entries on site.  Meeting the registration deadline is crucial to demonstrate quality planning in advance of the regional Showcase event.

Use the rubrics to guide the performance and develop the project

If the project develops and is brought to regional showcase, there are three categories:

Community Service: projects that extend outside the classroom to help the school/community

Instructional: projects that impact instruction and help with student or adult learning

Technical Expertise: project with a purpose; in-depth and specific use of hardware or software

How do you decide which project category?

Once the students begin work, see which area they are focused upon and how they can explain what they are doing: are they mostly teaching others; have they reached out to others; or is much of the work been on the project’s hardware or software?

For example: A regular news program can be any of the three categories. The project where students are making newscasts so others can learn or enjoy the content in the newscast is community service. If the project is about teaching others how to set up a newscast each week, with all the processes of getting features done, then could be instructional. If the students are explaining the how of the editing software and cameras, this can be technical.

The most important part is having the passion for what they are doing and can explain the project to others.

 

Community Service Projects examples

  • Assist non-profit agencies in technology needs
  • Host open houses with tech demonstrations
  • Publish written and virtual work
  • Produce school items for a purpose
  • Collaborate with others to solve a problem
  • Collaborate with another school, district, state, nation

 

Instructional Projects examples

  • Offer technology classes on topics
  • Teach parents, senior citizens, and fellow classmates
  • Form buddy partners with lower grades, peers, and staff 

 

Technical Expertise Projects examples

  • Support highly specialized topics in STEM topics
  • Offer technical support as a help desk service
  • Make patch cables, salvage parts from inoperable computers check and clean computers
  • Work with the school and district technology departments to support technology in schools or district
  • Seek industry standard technology certifications
  • Utilize technical skills with software and hardware
  • Deploy software upgrades or install new software
  • Troubleshoot video production issues; hook up hardware
  • Learn new software well to teach others


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STLP is Service

(REGIONALS & DIGITAL PRODUCT ONLINE JUDGING TO STATE CHAMPIONSHIP)

 

STLP is projects, products and services.  Many services develop due to student skill sets developing to routinely offer assistance in a particular area. The service may result from needs in the building or district.

Some services develop from a project that mushrooms into a service the school will provide.

Some projects and products are so frequent and popular they become a service the STLP School provides to others.

Often times the service is free of charge.

Sometimes the service can develop into a service and can generate funds for the STLP School.

Students that have skills in newscast communications, speaking and writing often excel in the service category.

ALL SERVICE CATEGORIES:

Students may apply online by the deadline for each of these individual categories. Use the rubrics to guide the performance.

REGIONAL QUALIFIERS

Media Arts: one student presents a resume and is interviewed to film and produce the State video. Open to 6-8 and 9-12 Divisions Only. Media Arts Rubric

Engineer Service: one student presents a resume, references, and is interviewed for technical positions at KySTE and State Championship, ISTE (pending).  9-12 Division Only. Engineer Service Rubric

Live Reporting Service: one student presents a resume and is interviewed for a position on a team at State. Open to K-5, 6-8 and 9-12 Divisions. Live Reporting Rubric

Production Company Service: one student presents a resume and is interviewed for the State camera crew. Open to 6-8 and 9-12 Divisions Only. Production Co Rubric

Social Media Service: one student presents a resume and is interviewed for a position to post Social Media updates at State and to help post scoring updates from Championship events. Open to 6-8 and 9-12 Divisions Only (updated 2015). Social Media Rubric

**NEW for 2015** Scratch Ambassador:  Info coming soon!

DIGITAL PRODUCT ONLINE JUDGING (DPOJ)

Reporter Service: one student posts a story about their Regional event for a reporter position at State

Presenter Service: 1-2students submit a 2 minute presentation video, slides & resume for a session at State

 

STATE CHAMPIONSHIP

Help Desk Desktop Support Service: one teampresents and markets the school’s technical support to judges at State

Newscast Service: one team documents and explains the school’s news program and includes a three (2) min. video

UL Podcast Service Telling Your Story: one team uploads best podcast to the UL server

 

Students demonstrate technical knowledge and know how; can problem solve technical issues in classrooms, school or district.

Students working with technical projects, maintaining networks, running help desks/desktop support and offering informal troubleshooting should apply.

 

STLP students gather technical knowledge with hands-on activities and self-study. Experience could also come from being a member of the school or district help desk, taking technical classes, or working in tech after school. Engineers sometimes gain vendor certifications offered in high schools across Kentucky.

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Getting STLP Started

Secure a person to be the STLP Coordinator.

  • Some STLP schools have more than one adult helping to support the students’ projects, products and services. Many parents and community persons support STLP.
  • STLP Coordinator vs. STLP Coach:  The STLP Coordinator will be the primary point of contact for State STLP events and communications.  STLP Coordinators frequently are those who complete online registrations, communicate with transportation departments, collect permissions slips, etc.  An STLP Coach can be anyone who helps facilitate students to participate in STLP activities.  In many instances, the STLP Coordinator also functions as the STLP Coach.  This is intended to help open up STLP opportunities to as many students and classrooms as possible.
  • Some districts offer stipends to STLP Coordinators. Some districts do not.
  • Gain the endorsement of the Principal, Superintendent, and District Technology Coordinator (DTC)/Chief Information Officer (CIO).

 

Communicate to parents and the community.

  • Market the program.
  • Use social media, webpages, etc. to get the word out about your STLP.

 

Open STLP to all students.

  • STLP is for ALL interested students, so your STLP should reflect your school’s population.
  • Use a variety of on-going approaches to recruit.
  • Try to attract students who are “naturals” with technology, but make sure all students get a chance to join sometime during the school year.

 

Data shows these students benefit:

  • ones new to the school,
  • ones not doing well in class,
  • ones who do not have a computer at home,
  • ones with special needs,
  • ones who speak another language,
  • and ones who rarely receive a teacher’s positive attention.

 

Work to recruit new members, especially girls in the upper grades.

Your STLP should have members from across the school’s population.

Your STLP should be multi-age and multi-grade over time.

Do Not Exclude Students

Do not allow your schedule or the student’s schedule or transportation problems limit your STLP.  This means, be clever and creative on how, when, and where students can help the school and community.  Consider a digital blended approach to how your STLP operates. Not all students must be involved in all projects all at the same time.

 

STLP is project driven.

Projects may spring from classrooms, after school or community needs. Let where students are during the day, and what projects they have an interest in doing, drive some of the projects in the program.

Publicize your meetings. Let students know when and where the meetings will take place. Some meet during a class; some meet before or after school.

Google STLP, find the STLP KY Department of Education website and mark the website address.: http://stlp.wpengine.com

Have you joined the STLP School Listserv? Your students may join the STLP Student listserv. Join both at http://www.uky.edu/Education/kylists.html

Discuss the STLP Mission and Goals. Talk about the structure of your STLP. Structure is centered on the 5 levels of participation, a schedule of when and how your STLP meets, and the goals the group wants to accomplish. There is no oneway to structure. Make the structure fit your school and its needs.

When planning projects, products and services, consider the technology standards for students and teachers, the school’s consolidated improvement plan, the needs and interests of the students and community. Student-designed projects, products and services drive STLP and impact learning and the school and community.

Some projects may lead to a service for the school or community; and some may be innovative/entrepreneurial; or teach/instruct others; and some are very technical in nature. These projects can be shared at a school, district, and state events or at the regional fall showcase.

  • Decide at what levels to be involved. (Local, district, regional showcase, statewide event)
  • Decide if and when students will excel and compete during the year.
  • Decide what events (regional or state) your STLP will attend.
  • Decide which students will participate in which of the three out of school of events: Regional Qualifiers, Digital Product Online judging (referred to as DPOJ) and/or State Championship.

Gain funding or raise funds for attending events, for materials needed for your STLP.

Jump online and register your STLP through the Get Recogonized! portal ( Get Recognized here!)

Arrange for a judge to be at the events you decide to be involved with this year.

Go online and submit information so your school is registered to attend an event.

Continue to market the program year round.

 

 

Contact Jeff Sebulsky anytime you have questions. (Jeff.sebulsky@education.ky.gov)

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Accomplishing the STLP Goals

All goals improve the students’ leadership skills. Coordinators guide students in creating projects, products and services. The projects, products and services accomplish the 6 STLP Goals.

Working on the goals help students gain 21st Century skills and meet ISTE Student Technology Standards (NETS). http://www.iste.org/standards/standards-for-students

Allowing students to be empowered to create projects, products and services increases that student’s feeling of accomplishment, and creates a sense of belonging.

How a school wishes to meet the goals is as different as each school.

When the STLP coordinator assures students are leaders of technology in the building; are a resource to teachers and fellow students; are allowed to create STLP projects, products and services in classrooms, the school and community; then this school’s STLP will shine and be recognized.

The Six Goals of STLP

(Click to enlarge)

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Tips for the STLP Coordinator

  • Read this Handbook and return to it as a reference frequently.
  • Guide students to select meaningful work.
  • Create projects, products and services authentic in nature. Students should be able to express that the project is making a difference in the school and community.
  • Base the projects students select to undertake on the need and interest of the students, school and community. The best projects come from the passions and interest of the team. Encourage students to use a variety of technology to communicate, support and extend their learning and create products for varies purposes, audiences and situations.
  • Guide students to engage in legal and ethical use of technology.
  • Look to see how classroom content and 21st Century skills can be woven into projects, products and services, so students can demonstrate what they know.
  • Remember others can support the work of STLP. Ask for help, have another teacher or parent work with groups. The community wants to help, include them. If others help, make sure you have a clear procedure for pick up and departure of students from any school, regional or state event. We want all students safe.
  • Select the best projects, products and services for competitions (Regionals, DPOJ & State).
  • Follow the rubrics in the handbook.
  • Check with the principal and the CIO/DTC to decide how best to finance the levels of involvement the school will undertake.
  • Talk to your principal early to secure money for a bus and any overnight stay.
  • Some schools must raise money to attend events or stay overnight.
  • Look at sharing a bus within the district to go to Regionals or State.

 

If unsure about any issue, contact Jeff Sebulsky (jeff.sebulsky@education.ky.gov)

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Major STLP Events Out of the Building

The work a school does in the building to help support technology and help students and teachers gain technology skills is the most important work an STLP can do.

Many schools begin reaching out in the community to help that community using technology.

A school can decide to become involved outside the building by attending an event in which student demonstrations and recognition is woven into each event.

When a school leaves the building for one of the events, a judge must be asked to attend, too.

 

REGISTER ONLINE TO ATTEND AN STLP EVENT

 

Regional Qualifiers — Deadline Oct. 23, 2015       

Digital Product Online Judging —  Deadline Jan. 22, 2016

State Championship — Deadline March 13, 2015

 

Schools decide which events in which to participate. Online registration is required to attend or participate.  STLP groups are welcome to register as “Attend Only” for Fall Showcase or State Championship (meaning your group will be onsite to experience the event, but not participate in any competitions)

 

REAL WORK IN REAL SITUATIONS IN REAL TIME


STLP schools should look around the school and community for ideas and real work:

  • School projects, products and services which arise from opportunities
  • Join the listserv, follow @STLPKentucky and watch for more opportunities via Facebook or Google+
  • Look for local issues to address with innovative technology solutions
  • Look for a community or global collaborative partner
  • Think about what needs filling, needs help in the building or community
  • Think about what students need to know
  • Think about what students have an interest in and pursue those interests

 

WHAT TO DO

 

In order to participate:

Schools should ask principals, DTC/CIO for permission (and $$) to attend the event

With tight budgets, talk to your principal and CIO/DTC early.

Think about fundraisers to support meals, travel and overnight stays

Obtain transportation to the event based upon school and board policy

Share a bus with other schools in the district that are attending.

Belong to the listserv and read all listserv emails concerning the events.    Join the STLP listserv — http://www.uky.edu/Education/kylists.html

Register online prior to deadline dates

Decide whom to ask to judge. Decide how they qualify to be certified. Inform the judge of the date of the event(s). Ask for an email address to include on the online form. Take responsibility for your judge.

Prepare all permission slips prior to attending

Watch the listserv for reminders

Obtain rubrics and share with students. Follow the steps on the rubric.

Secure chaperones to assist

Make name tags for students and adults attending, include your judge

Send a press release to local media

Ask questions prior to the event by emailing Jeff (jeff.sebulsky@education.ky.gov)

Remind your judge to attend and arrive on time, or to judge virtually in a prompt manner

Send feedback after any event, which is important for rewriting this handbook and redirecting issues.

 

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Recognition

STLP groups strive to accomplish the 6 Goals of STLP.  There are many ways to demonstrate how your STLP meets those goals and there are several ways to be recognized for those accomplishments.

 


LOCAL RECOGNITION

When your STLP accomplishes something for your school or classroom, you are often recognized internally.  Many STLP groups present to their local board of education or open house nights at the school.  You are encouraged to document those events — and the activities which lead up to that recognition.

Those documented moments are many times shared by local STLP’s through their social media feeds or on their STLP website.  Please be sure to forward those links to the State STLP Coordinator and tag #STLPKentucky on those posts.  Tremendous effort is made to promote your success stories, tweets, photos and recognitions out to the larger STLP audience and throughout KDE.  Let us toot your horn so more STLP groups can benefit from seeing successful groups in action!

 


STATE RECOGNITION

Submitting information about your STLP to the STLP Coordinator for the Kentucky Department of Education is your first step to starting a new STLP.  With the help of a short online form, your STLP will become eligible for additional recognitions and awards, but you will also become part of a bigger STLP community.

State Recognition is open to any active STLP group.  Once submitted, your STLP can claim the “Get Recognized!” STLP Level Up badge (see below for details).  Visit http://stlp.wpengine.com/recognized/  to submit your STLP group today!

 


LEVEL UP (STLP BADGES)

STLP implements gamification principles to recognize meaningful experiences that students achieve through involvement in STLP. The concept of gamification is based the idea to use game design concepts, or elements, in a non-game context. In our case, we will utilize badges to recognize elements of experiences that STLP students can participate in throughout the year.

STLP groups can claim badges for a number of different activities. Various Level Up badges are listed under 5 different categories: AchievementCollaborationContributionProgression, and Challenges. Here are some examples:

  • Achievement – Earn public recognition for completing events (register a Fall Showcase Project, for example)
  • Collaboration – Work with others to accomplish goals (do a Lync call with another STLP group to peer review a Digital Product, for example)
  • Contribution – Sharing content, news, ideas, feedback as a way to connect STLP with your school, parents, community and peers (submit an idea for a new badge, for example)
  • Progression – Level up by achieving cumulative badges (compete in every category of a state level event, for example)
  • Challenges – Tackle new activity challenges within a limited amount of time (posted randomly throughout the year – for example, Post a Picture of your STLP with your Superintendent)

 

STLP badges “reset” each school year. Future use of the STLP Level UP program will include collecting badges and redeeming them for “points” towards achieving/maintaining Gold Status.

To read more and to download your badges, visit the STLP Level Up webpage 

Badge-Hour-of-Code

 


STLP-Gold-Status-logo

 

Gold Status

Any STLP may apply for Gold and Silver Status.  Gold Status is conferred once a school submits evidence that meets criteria listed on the “Request Gold Status Rubric“. If an STLP only reaches Silver Status, they may reapply the following year, with updated/new evidence, for Gold Status.

Once Gold Status is achieved, that STLP may retain Gold Status by (1) maintaining an active STLP with uninterrupted Gold Status from the previous year, (2) re-submitting STLP info to the Get Recognized! database annually (3) completing the online form to identify the (minimum) 7 STLP Level Up badges their group has earned during the current STLP year, (4) and by providing a short, simple, overview of their STLP activities.  See “Retain Gold Status Rubric” here.

 

Benefit of Attaining/Retaining Gold Status

STLP groups that reach Gold Status have the immediate benefit of submitting 4 Fall Showcase Projects.  Normally, that limit is set a 3 projects per school.

Districts that wish to attain Platinum/Titanium Status are only eligible to apply once all schools in that district has attained Gold Status.  Platinum/Titanium districts have the added benefit of submitting up to 5 Fall Showcase projects.

 

Evidence of STLP Involvement for Requesting Gold Status

STLP groups should apply for Gold Status if it is their first time requesting Gold Status, if they achieved Silver Status last year, or if the STLP missed a year of Gold Status by failing to submit to retain Gold Status from the previous year.

Step 1: Submit your STLP to the Get Recognized database

Step 2:  Using the criteria below (and found in the rubric),  create an electronic presentation documenting what the STLP is doing.  Schools may use any method they choose to create the presentation – get creative or keep it simple.  The only technical requirement is that the presentation must be viewable online (or is downloadable) and can be reviewed by judging committee using readily available devices  (i.e. no special software is required).

The major components of evidence to be documented include (from rubric):

  • targeting the STLP mission and goals
  • describing types of STLP projects/events from the year
  • detailing recruitment efforts
  • describing the communication avenues used to generate school/community awareness of STLP opportunities & accomplishments
  • stating the vision/purpose/goals of your STLP
  • discussing how the STLP represents your school outside of the building

 

Step 3: Identify and explain how your STLP earned at least 7 STLP Level Up badges during the current year.

Step 4: Provide short description of how your students have acted as representatives of STLP during the current year.

Your presentation URL will need to be submitted with this form. That URL should not link to any password protected webpages.  Like STLP, these presentation are always best when they are student designed and student driven.  All presentation should follow good digital citizenship guidelines, contain NO personally identifiable information about students, and follow all pertinent copyright requirements.

 

Process to Retain Gold Status

Schools that have already achieved Gold Status should select “Retain Gold Status” on the following form and check off requirements to confirm that all information is complete. Please be ready to describe any highlights, accomplishments, and/or favorite projects from this school year.

New for 2015-2016 – Identify how your STLP has earned at least 7 STLP Level Up badges during the current year (remember, Level Up badges reset each July 1).

Link to Online Gold Status Request Form

To submit your request for Gold Status — or to retain your current Gold Status — please follow this link to the online form 

 


TITANIUM/PLATINUM STATUS

 

Many schools are doing powerful things because STLP has strong District level support.  To recognize this support, districts may apply for Titanium/Platinum Status.  This level is reserved for districts that proudly have 100% of their schools with active STLP groups.  Each of those individual schools must also have attained Gold Status prior to a district submitting their proposal for Titanium/Platinum Status.

Interested districts will document how the STLP groups across their district are actively engaged in the Five Levels of STLP Involvement.  Those 5 levels include school, district, regional, state and national levels of activity.

Platinum is the highest level a district can achieve. Some districts will strive to reach the Titanium level first, and then use an additional school year to fulfill remaining requirements to reach Platinum level.

While many districts will establish a district-wide committee of STLP Coordinators to help gather all required evidence needed for the submission, it is imperative that a district have leadership from the CIO/DTC/District STLP Coordinator prior to starting the process.  Contact your CIO/DTC/District STLP Coordinator to discuss your interest.  Then, that CIO/DTC/District STLP Coordinator should email Jeff Sebulsky (jeff.sebulsky@education.ky.gov) for further instructions.

If your district is ready to begin the process of attaining Titanium or Platinum Status, review the rubric and contact Jeff.

Download the Titanium/Platinum Status rubric in PDF

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Partial List of Resources

First and foremost, refer to the STLP webpage for the most up-to-date news and resources for STLP.  For communications, be sure to join the STLP Listserv group to get STLP news and update announcements to your email inbox, but also to participate in the overall STLP community.  Also, take advantage to online media resources by following @STLPKentucky on Twitter or “Like” STLPKentucky on Facebook.

All STLP Resources

http://stlp.wpengine.com

 

STLP Listserv

http://www.uky.edu/Education/kylists.html

Join to learn from other coordinators and be updated on STLP events and opportunities.

 

STLP Twitter

(Coordinated by Susan Jenkins, Bullitt County TIS)

You can follow @STLPKentucky on Twitter by visiting:  http://www.twitter.com/stlpkentucky

Follow the updates and share what you are doing in your schools with STLP.

 

Digital Citizenship

Digital: Literacy; Communications; Access; Security; Etiquette; Rights & Responsibilities; Health & Wellness; Law; Commerce

http://www.digitalcitizenship.net     (ISBM: 978-1-56484-232-9 Mike Ribble & Gerald Bailey 2007)

 

Digital Driver’s License:

http://otis.coe.uky.edu/DDL/launch.php or download the app via iTunes

 

State STLP Coordinator: 

Schedule a district visit with Jeff Sebulsky (jeff.sebulsky@education.ky.gov)

 

Local Human Resources

These persons may offer ideas for projects; advise, teach or assist the STLP School:

  • Central Office Staff
  • Community Persons
  • Dataseam Initiative
  • DTC/CIO-District Technology Coordinator
  • District Technical Staff
  • District or School Technology Integration Specialist (TIS)
  •  Fellow Teachers
  • Friends of STLP
  • Library Media Specialist (LMS)
  • Mentors
  • Parents
  • STLP State Advisory Council 

 

Partners

Central Ky Inventors http://www.ckic.org/, Dataseam Initiative, Explorium of Lexington, Heritage Council, KET, Kentucky Virtual Library (KVL), Kentucky School Board Association (KSBA), Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation (KSTC), KySTE, ISTE, The Center for Rural Development, and the Eastern Kentucky Exposition Center all support STLP.

 

Kentucky Girls Stem Collaborative & Aspirations in Computing /NCWIT

KY Girls Collaborative Project

http://www.ngcproject.org/kentucky/
http://www.ngcproject.org/    
http://www.ncwit.org/programs-campaigns/aspirations-computing

 

Did You Know: STEM Edition

http://youtu.be/R8twBGoGRqc
University of Kentucky STEM Education Department & P20 STEM Education Lab created this slideshow.

 

University Partners

Colleges across Kentucky are great partners to STLP. Many of the universities provide post-secondary opportunity at showcase and the state event. Present supporting universities: Eastern, Georgetown, KSU, Morehead, Murray, Northern Kentucky, UK, UL, Western.  The colleges who have supported STLP in the past: Thomas More, Lindsey Wilson, UPike and Hazard Community College.

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Regionals

About Regionals

The school level is the foundation and most important area of involvement for STLP.

Schools decide what projects, products and services the group will offer the school and community.

These day-to-day, week-to-week activities/projects allow students to gain technology and leadership skills.

 

The schools can expand the participation from school level to a regional level. Eight sites around Kentucky host an STLP Regional event. Having regionals on a college campus site impacts the future post-secondary plans of the STLP student, provides college role models, and allows for university interactions with school districts. The opportunity to celebrate and come together motivates and extends the local STLP School. The opportunity to display student work, to demonstrate technology-integrated skills for other students, teachers, administrators, university and the public is a major objective. When one school sees how another school uses technology for student achievement and classroom integration, this has a direct impact of what the school, teachers and students will do in the future.

 

Attending and interviewing at this event is a big deal in the life of some of our STLP students, as noted in stories from students, teachers and parents. This event gives a real audience to their learning, a real purpose in creating resumes and sharpening 21st Century Skills. These students’ skills will impact Kentucky’s future economy. The students will be able to compete globally. Leadership skills will bloom.

When the students meet and compete -the whole day is called STLP Regionals, or STLP Regional Qualifier.

The events are designed to support and extend authentic learning.

 

Student demonstrates skills at the event:

  • Implement, market and design the project or presentation for various purposes, audiences and situations
  • Build leadership skills
  • Utilize research, critical thinking skills to inquiry/problem-solve and make informed decisions for learning
  • Create ideas, products, and presentations that are innovative and creative
  • Communicate and collaborate with school and community persons
  • Communicate and interview with adults, outside the school building, in a professional manner
  • Practice and engage in legal, safe and ethical use of technology
  • Plan for post-secondary education

 

When registering online, schools may select the showcase site that is nearest to the school or district.

 

Common elements of good projects:

  • Products and new ideas are sometimes generated from the project.
  • Students have to create and carry out the project over time.
  • Students must be able to discuss the project in depth. (Age appropriate)
  • The project is tied to many human and technology resources.
  • The project makes an impact on other persons, the school and/or community

 

The three types of projects are:

  • Community Service: projects that extend outside the classroom to help the school and/or community
  • Instructional: projects that impact instruction and help with student or adult learning
  • Technical Expertise: projects that are specific to the use of hardware and software; areas of STEM

 

STLP Coordinators that attend find other coordinators to discuss project, product or service ideas.

First time coordinators find the Regional event a time to discover what a project really looks like and how the event leads to state.

Often judges that attend Regionals can return to the school and help the school’s project get stronger.

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Regional Events FAQ

How does the school register to attend?

Schools must register online by Oct. 23, 2015. There is no cost to register or attend. Visit http://stlp.wpengine.com to enter the online registration portal

 

What groups of students compete at Regional Qualifiers?

  • Media Arts Service: one student presents a resume and is interviewed to join the team that will record and produce media that highlight the events occurring at the State Championship.  Their content will be shown during the Awards Ceremony and posted to the STLP website
    View Media Arts Service Rubric
  • Engineer Service: one student presents a resume, references, and is interviewed for technical positions.  Engineers are considered the pinnacle of STLP and will have responsibilities that include representing STLP at state and national levels
    View Engineer Service Rubric
  • Live Reporting Service: one student presents a resume and is interviewed for a position with the Live Reporting Team at the State Championship.  Live reports from around the State event are broadcast throughout the day
    View Live Reporting Service Rubric
  • Production Company Service: one student presents a resume and is interviewed for a position on the production team that operates (among other things) as the camera crew during the State Championship and to live broadcast the Award Ceremony
    View Production Company Rubric
  • Showcase Project: One to four students create and present the project for Level One Judges.  Selected Projects will be invited to Level Two judging at the State Championship, with the goal of making it to Level Three judging and possibly being named “Best Showcase in Kentucky”.
    View Regional (Level 1) Project Planner (also editable MS Word Version here)
    View Regional (Level 1) Project Rubric
    View Complete Project Information Packet (includes Rubrics for Level 1, 2 & 3
  • Social Media Service : one student presents a resume and is interviewed for a position to Tweet at State
    View Social Media Service Rubric

 

What are the 2015 Regional Qualifier dates and sites?

November 05 Murray State University Showcase, Curris Center
November 10 University of Louisville Showcase, Student Activities Center
November 12 University of Kentucky, Lexington Center
November 17 The Center for Rural Development, Somerset
November 19 Northern Kentucky University, Student Activities Center
December 09 Eastern Kentucky Exposition Center, Pikeville
December 02
Western Kentucky University, Diddle Arena
December 14 Morehead State University, Adron Doran University Center

 

How do I keep informed about the event?

Join the KYSTLP Listerv for direct communications (http://www.uky.edu/Education/kylists.html)

Follow @stlpkentucky on Twitter for up to the minute STLP news and updates

Did you know that you can get tweets delivered straight to your smart phone via text message?  All you need to do is text “Follow @STLPKentucky” to 40404.  That’s it — then you’ll get all of our updates directly via SMS.  You’ll never miss an announcement again!

Fast Follow @STLPKentucky

Screen shot of @STLPKentucky Fast Follow in action!

 

What does the schedule look like?

Likely schedule at most sites: times below are local time of the regional site.

8:30 – 9:00         Judges arrive and check in

9:00 – 10:00       Judges receive final training, instructions, and set up for judging

9:00 – 9:50         Registration, check in by schools, Showcase tables set up

9:30- 9:50          Service Category students sign up for interview time slot

10:00-12:00       Welcome and  Judging of all categories (Projects and Service Category)

10:00-12:00       Showcase is open to the public for visitors, students remain at their table.

About 12:00       Once judging is complete, announcement will be made to pack up areas

12:00-2:00         Judge teams continue to deliberate and submit comments/scores

 

What can you do to prepare students?

Make sure all competing students read and understand the rubric and are prepared for any interviews.

The most successful STLP groups hold a pre-Showcase/School Showcase/District Showcase to provide students with practical experience presenting to adults prior to the Regional Showcase.

At the Fall Showcase event, know that all service categories and showcases will need to provide their own devices during presentations/interviews.  For example, if you want to show judges a video, instead of arriving with a DVD copy only, plan to bring a laptop or have it preloaded on a mobile device.  Judges will not have devices to Although internet is available, be prepared with a back up plan to present in an offline mode or via a secondary, personal hot-spot connection.

 

Should beginning STLP students and a new STLP school attend Regional Qualifier?

Absolutely!  Everyone can benefit by attending and seeing other student leaders demonstrating technology.

New STLP schools, new coordinators and beginning STLP students are welcome to attend for the learning experience.

Also, a great way to demonstrate the value of STLP, STEM, and educational technology is to invite your principal, superintendent and state legislators to see a Fall Showcase.  Generally, everyone who see’s students in action at Fall Showcase will be impressed and gain an understanding of the immeasurable value behind technology enhanced learning.

 

How do I plan for food while at STLP Reginonal?

Food for purchase is at most sites. Schools may also bring in a sack lunch at every site. Coolers for food and drinks are allowed.

Many of the college campuses have student centers in which your students may eat. We consider this an educational experience since students will be interacting with others on campus.

Some schools like to eat at a food establishment while on the way back to school.

 

When is the deadline to register online?

Deadline to register to attend a 2015 Regional Qualifier is Oct. 23, 2015.

*To gain a table and set up at time to be judged, a school must register online and provide a judge. Due to large numbers that register, a late school could be turned away from their first choice showcase site.

 

Where do I go to register?    

Visit http://stlp.wpengine.com to find all registration materials and links

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Regionals: Project Rubrics

There are a number of new features incorporated into the Regional: Showcase Rubrics for both the interview categories and the project category.  Here we will explore those updates.

 

Showcase Projects

Feedback from recent Regional events revealed requests for the Level 1 (Regional) Project rubric to better recognize the “in progress” nature of many projects at the time of Regionals.  Also, a consistent suggestion was to create a more discernible difference between Regional: Level 1 and Semifinal: Level 2 Project Rubrics.

At the STLP State Championship for 2014, the Level 2 Rubric was updated and was well received. The updated version simplified scoring, weighed certain areas differently, and had an additional focus on development and impact of projects during the period between Fall Showcase and State Championship. Likewise, adjustments have now been made to the Level 1 Showcase Project rubric and Level 2 Project Planner.

 

About the Regional (Level 1) Project Rubric?

Starting with the updated Project Planner, there is clearly a new focus on team self reflection prior to Fall Showcase.  Teams are asked to acknowledge if their project has been reviewed using the Level 1 Rubric, specifically if the team’s STLP Coordinator/Teacher has gone through that process with the team.  With the updates to the Level 1 rubric, this step was important to encourage a thorough review of the rubric prior to competition.

Also new, there is a specific focus on consideration and recognition of how the overall project process (from inception to development to deployment) reflects technology standards.  Adapted from the ISTE Standards for Students, these standards are broken into six (6) categories with four (4) sub-categories each (designated A through C).

Each team is required to reflect upon their project (or planned project) to identify at least six (6) individual sub-categories that has been/will be addressed during their project cycle.  In other words, from the 24 individual blocks describing how a standard can be applied, choose at least six (6), identify them on your Project Planner sheet, and be prepared to discuss how those standards apply to their project.

STLP Coordinators/Teachers are encouraged to assist teams in identifying and understanding the standards.  Once STLP Coordinators/Teachers review the technology standards listed on the Project Planner sheet, they will most likely realize that each project easily addresses more than six of the standards.

With the standards your team is prepared to discuss clearly marked on your Project Planner sheet, Regional: Level 1 judges may ask students how those standards apply to their project.  A hefty 30 points on the rubric is dedicated to teams being able to discuss at least six (6) of the standards as they apply to their Showcase Project.  Addressing only 1-5 of the standards will earn your team a reduced 15 points, and not addressing any standards will earn a team zero (0) points for that category on the Level 1 rubric.

 

Why Are the ISTE Technology Standards Being Used?

A quick review of the Level 1, 2, and 3 Showcase Project rubrics from previous years will show that the ISTE Standards have been used as a framework for scoring projects for quite some time.  For 2014, those standards have simply been applied in a distinct and organized way.  By breaking the standards down into sub-categories, giving teams the flexibility to consider all of the standards, encouraging STLP Coordinators/Teachers to guide the students, and giving significant weight to the standards, the Level 1 rubric is now much more flexible and ready to accommodate in-progress/under development projects in a more fair way.  Since considering the standards and being able to discuss how a project has/will address the standards, the rubric will more accurately focus on the project intent and less on level of implementation at the time of the Regional event.

Returning on the Level 1 rubric will be a focus on copyright and ethical use of technology, a strong presentation experience, a gauge of student involvement/engagement and a how proudly each team incorporated the new (or old) STLP logo into their presentation area.

 

Download the Rubric and Project Planner

Follow these links to access the latest versions of the Showcase Project Information packet and various Fall Showcase interview category rubrics:

 

 Regional (Level 1) Project Rubric only (PDF)

 

 Regional (Level 1) Project Planner only (PDF) or Editable Version (.DOCx)

 

 Complete Project Information Packet (includes Semifinal (Level 2) and Finalist (Level 3) Rubrics/Planner) (PDF)

 

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Regionals: Service Rubrics

Regional events are not only about Showcase Projects.  The service category interviews also occur on site during Regional Events.

Students who wish to participate in one of the several service teams at the STLP State Championship start their journey at the Regional Event level.  At Regionals, these interested students are interviewed using the rubrics (links below).  Students who are selected to be part of the service teams will come to the State Championship and participate throughout the day to report on event live, keep everyone informed about the day via social media, recording the day’s events for a video presentation or even operating the service/support program for the entire event.

 

What are the Service Categories that interview at Regionals?

Media Arts Service : one student presents sample work and is interviewed to join the team that will record and produce media that highlight the events occurring at the State Championship.  Their content will be shown during the Awards Ceremony and posted to the STLP website
(Division Levels 6-8, 9-12 Only)

Engineer Service: one student presents a resume, references, and is interviewed for technical positions.  Engineers are considered the pinnacle of STLP and will have responsibilities that include representing STLP at state and national levels
(Division Level 9-12 Only)

Live Reporting Service: one student presents sample work and is interviewed for a position with the Live Reporting Team at the State Championship.  Live reports from around the State event are broadcast throughout the day
(Open to all Division Levels K-5, 6-8, and 9-12)

Production Company Service: one student presents sample work and is interviewed for a position on the production team that operates (among other things) as the camera crew during the State Championship and to live broadcast the Award Ceremony
(Division Levels 6-8, 9-12 Only)

Scratch Ambassador:  one student presents examples of Scratch projects the student has developed.  Scratch is a free tool that students can use for creative computing.  It is available online http://scratch.mit.edu . If selected, student will be part of the team at STLP State Championship that hosts/assists visitors in the Scratch Playground, where visitors can explore Scratch as well as remix and create digital projects.  Working knowledge of Scratch and strong interpersonal skills required. (Open to all Division Levels K-5, 6-8 and 9-12)

Social Media Service (formerly Twitter Service): one student presents sample work and is interviewed for a position to capture moments, provide updates on what’s happening, update schedule changes in the app, and report finalist via various social media services at State
(Division Levels 6-8, 9-12 Only)

 

Download the Service Category Interview Rubrics

 Engineer Service rubric (PDF)

 Live Reporting Service Rubric (PDF)

 Media Arts Service Rubric (PDF) (formerly Cyber Shorts)

 Production Company Service Rubric (PDF)

 Social Media Service Rubric (PDF) (formerly Twitter)

Scratch Ambassador Service Rubric (PDF)

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Seven Steps in Project Planning

At one of the meetings with the students, the coordinator can lead the discussion on how to plan a project. If a school’s STLP has more than one project, this guide may help the coordinator plan the projects and manage how to work with one student leader of each project.  Schools may have more than one project; however, the registration limit for Fall Showcase is 3 projects represented by no more than 4 students (some exemptions apply — see section Badges)

Step One

Brainstorm ideas for projects that would impact the school or community.

As a team, determine projects your school would like to focus upon this year.

Step Two

Do you have any research or data, need or interest by students to support the project?

Step Three

Select one project a small group (team 1-4 students) wishes to implement.

Consider the following questions:

  • Is the project a returning project?
  • How will the project impact others?
  • Does the project accomplish STLP goal(s)?
  • Does the project help?
  • Teachers gain Technology Standards?
  • Students gain technology skills?
  • Community persons gain technology skills?
  • Persons increase learning with the help of technology?
  • Is the project carried out over time?
  • Will the students hold interest in the project after the initial stages?
  • How does the project reach out to people or the community?
  • Is the project highly technical, instructional or community service based?
  • Is the project assisting with any areas of STEM[1]?
  • Does your group believe they can succeed in accomplishing the project?

 

Step Four

Talk about the project:

  • Has the school done this project before? Is there new work the new students can do to improve the returning project?
  • What type of project is it? (Community Service, Instructional, or Technical Expertise)
  • When to do the project? What has to be done? Who is responsible?
  • What resources are needed? (Materials and people)
  • How will you determine feedback and outcomes?
  • How will you collect the information to show impact?
  • Who will you collaborate with to make the project stronger?

 

Step Five

STLP is open to all students.

To ensure a stronger team, the make-up of the team members can be diverse in talent. A team could include: a student that is beginning to learn technology, one who likes to talk about the project, one with technical skills, and one which could teach others about the project. This can make a well-rounded team.

Check with students about sports, AP Testing, other club trips that may affect the student being involved with the presentation of the project at Fall Showcase and at State Championship.

Step Six

Have someone record who and what are being done in order to complete the project and document the progress.

Step Seven

Does the project warrant going to fall showcase in the project category to compete? If yes, then register project online.

 

[1] STEM= Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

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Digital Product Online Judging

DPOJ Overview

The STLP core principles of “Design. Make. Connect. Learn.” are perhaps most evident in the only event that takes place 100% in the digital realm:  Digital Product Online Judging (DPOJ).

Digital product creation is part of learning in many classrooms across Kentucky.  The DPOJ event provides every school the opportunity to share the products students are creating — whether it’s part of daily curriculum or a stand-alone activity with an STLP.  Students are making digital content every day.  The STLP DPOJ event lets you submit that work for statewide recognition as part of the STLP process.

Schools may submit their two best products (some categories allow only 1 submission) from each of the categories listed below.  Each product will need to be accessible online (it’s up to each school to determine their best plan for how to host the products online) via a unique web address.  During the registration process, each school will submit the web address needed to view the various digital products created by students.  A pool of judges across the state will then receive judging assignments and, using rubrics specific to each category, remotely score the digital products, and submit their scores electronically.  After all scores have been collected, the qualifying digital products will become finalists for judging at the STLP State Championship event in the spring.

 

Frequently Asked DPOJ Questions

How do we learn about the DPOJ Categories?  Read each product rubric carefully.  Each rubric has details about what the category is about.  Also, use the rubric to self-reflect on the product before submitting registrations.  Check the DPOJ section of the STLP Website to view samples of products from previous years.

What is the Process URL?  Read each product rubric carefully.  Many call for you to submit a separate document where the student describes the process and tools he/she used to create their product. This document should have it’s own web address.  That is the Process URL.

What constitutes a “Team?”  Products are generally classified as either “Individual” or “Team” events.  Teams can consist of more than one student, but only one student could constitute a team, also.  Team sizes are not limited.  An entire STLP group can make up a team; however, if the product is selected to be presented at State, teams will need to nominate their top four presenters to represent the product during judging.

Can students submit more than one product? Yes, as long as they are in different product categories.

Can products mash-up videos, music, or other digital items from other authors?  STLP Digital Products should be 100% original.  If you utilize any portion of someone else’s work, be certain that it is properly attributed, used in accordance with the artists wishes and with express permission, and properly cited.

For more information about copyright and appropriate use of copyrighted work, please visit the “Digital Citizenship” tab on the Resources section of the STLP Website

Will someone contact me if our links don’t work?  The key element of DPOJ is that your student’s projects are available online.  Your students are depending on you to make sure the links you register work.  If judges can not easily click to your products, they are not obligated to contact you and are allowed to disqualify those products.  Many judges choose to reach out to you and offer a 24 hour window to correct broken links (so entering an accurate email address with your registration is vital). Working links are crucial.  Don’t count on judges to give you a second chance.

 

TIPS for Posting Products Online
  • Judges prefer web links that jump directly to the specific product/process being reviewed.  Jumping to a directory of all DPOJ entries for your school can be confusing and frustrating.  Make reaching your products as easy as possible for the judges.
  • Test your links from home, from your phone, from school, etc. before posting.  Ask friends to check that they work, too.  Judges will be connecting from all over the state — make it as easy for them as you can.
  • No passwords or usernames to access your products. Judges should be able to simply click and go!
  • How your STLP chooses to post your digital products is entirely your decision; however, it is vital that you test all links from both inside and outside the school network before posting in your registration.
  • If a judge can not easy connect and view a product, it is their prerogative to assign a zero score and disqualify the product outright.  Although the judges are encouraged to reach out to coordinators regarding links, please be aware that they are not required to do so.
  • Judges that choose to reach out to Coordinators regarding broken/not working links will give a reasonable timeframe for links to be fixed.  Beyond that time period, judges are welcome to assign a zero score and disqualify the product.
  • TEST. YOUR. LINKS before posting… please!  Don’t let mistakes made by adults negatively affect your students.  Thank you for your efforts on this important piece of the DPOJ event!

 

About DPOJ Judges and their role in scoring products?

NOTICE: Each school will provide at least one volunteer judge to qualify for participation in any DPOJ competitions.  With the explosive growth of the STLP DPOJ competition and the sheer volume of entries, some groups may be required to provide more than one judge:

  • STLP groups submitting between 1 – 8 products must provide (at least) one volunteer judge.
  • STLP groups submitting 9 or more products must provide a second judge, as well.

 

What will DPOJ Judges do?
  • Read an email and be reminded by the school to complete the virtual judging in the specified time
  • Open the email with the information about judging
  • Look for the group you have been assigned to judge; each item has a title and a URL location
  • Review Copyright. All work the students do is to be original. All judges must look for copyright issues first. Look at the product. If you see any part of the product that seems familiar in text or graphics, or image, then question it.
  • Open the rubric that matches your assigned category to judge, open the group list of pieces to judge (look for your name)
  • Click the URL location using your web browser and find by name the item in your group list
  • Using the rubric score the item- the purpose is to decide the best piece/score among your group
  • There can be no ties so the best needs to be the highest score among your group
  • Record the scores on the group sheet provide
  • Return scores on group sheet on time via email for your assigned group
  • Pieces will continue to be judged by other judges until the top best pieces are selected

The best pieces in each product and service category above will be invited to State Championship.  Rubrics are being updated to reflect new final steps in participation at State (some will need to be presented on site, while others will receive final review and scoring without requiring the student to be present (freeing them to sign up for other activities available at the STLP State Championship).

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DPOJ Rubrics

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DPOJ Categories

Schools may submit in each category their top two products for online judging. Judges will receive the list of online products to score. Judges will determine which products are of quality and invite these to State Championship. The rubric score defines quality.

 

 NOTE: STLP Digital Products are under constant refinement and development in order to incorporate the most up-to-date emerging technological opportunities available to students.  To that end, be aware that new categories could be added regularly throughout the year.  However, you may rest assured that categories will not be removed until after a competition cycle is completed each year.

 

Products

  • Digital Art Product: one student creates original digital art
  • Documentary Product: one team creates an original documentary video using new footage
  • ePublishing Product: one team creates a published product used by a class/school/community
  • Feature Product: one team creates a video using new footage
  • Graphic Design Product: one student creates a graphic design
  • KATE – Each year folks from Murray State’s KATE program sponsor a category. This is currently in development.  Announcments will be made when product category has been finalized and published.
  • KSU GIS/MAPS/Cartography Product: one team creates a digital map or model
  • KnowHow2Pay PSA Challenge: New for 2016!  Sponsored by Gear UP Kentucky, the KyC3 Coalition invites you to create a PSA about various avenues to help pay for college that may be used in a statewide awareness campaign
  • Manipulated Image Product: one student takes an original photo, manipulates it into a totally new image
  • Multimedia Content Product: one student uses three types of digital media to teach a concept
  • Music Product: one student creates an original digital music piece
  • Photo Product: one student takes an original image
  • PSA Product: one team creates a PSA video (15, 30 or 60 sec.)
  • Storytelling Product: one student writes an original story
  • Technical Writing Product: one student creates a technical piece

 

Services

  • Blogger Corps: one student posts a story about Regionals for a position on State team that blogs about the Championship event (formerly called Cyber Gazette and/or STLP Reporters)
  • Presenter Service: 1-2 students submit a 2-minute presentation video, slides & resume

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DPOJ – Info for Judges

The key element of Digital Product Online Judging is the judge.  When each school registers their products, they must provide at least one judge to join the pool of people working online to score products. With so many products to score, volunteers are encouraged (and appreciated) to sign up online at:  http://stlp.wpengine.com/volunteer to help with DPOJ.  Due to the thousands of digital products that are submitted, the need for online judges is tremendous.

 

What are the duties of an Online Judge?

The entire process will occur via the internet.  When a judge is registered (either with a school or as a volunteer), they will receive instructional emails from the State STLP Program Coordinator guiding them through the entire process.

Here is a basic overview:

  1. Read an email and be reminded by the school to complete the online judging in the specified time
  2. Open the email with the information about judging
  3. Look for the group you have been assigned to judge; each item has a title and a URL location
  4. Review Copyright. All work the students do is to be original. All judges must look for copyright issues first. Look at the product. If you see any part of the product that seems familiar in text or graphics, or image, then question it.
  5. Open the rubric that matches your assigned category to judge, open the group list of pieces to judge (rubrics will be attached to assignment email)
  6. Click the URL location using your web browser and find by name the item in your group list
  7. Using the rubric, score the digital product with the purpose to determine the best piece/score among your group
  8. Record the scores and comments on the electronic form at the provided link (or in the provided spreadsheet document) for your group.
  9. NOTE: Comments are required on any disqualified product, and are expected/appreciated for every judged product.  Comments from judges have the great potential impact for student growth and STLP development.

 

Pieces will continue to be judged by other judges until the top best pieces are selected

The piece from one scoring group gets placed into another group until the best pieces arise. These final pieces will be invited to the State Championship.

 

What are the requirements for DPOJ Judges?

Schools will need to produce at least one judge.  That person should be a current or former educator and can include district technology staff, STCs, TRTs, TIS’, principals, central office staff, etc.  Judges can also be content experts, such as a professional photographer, videographer, or digital artist.  The strongest judges will help bring out the best in our student digital products.

Digital Product judges should be proficient with navigating the internet.  While each digital product is required to be readily accessible online by judges inside and outside the Kentucky Department of Education’s network, it may be necessary from time to time for a DPOJ judge to “look around” a webpage.

Because our goal is to help STLP Students succeed, we strive to never disqualify a digital product because of a broken or bad online link.  However, the judges may use their discretion to determine how they proceed when a broken link to a product is encountered.  While judges are fully justified (according to the rubric) to stop judging the product and assign it a “Zero” score, they are also allowed to contact the STLP Coordinator for a school to iron out the issue.  Any judge will need to make the most fair and reasonable decision possible in those circumstances.

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State Championship

About State Championship

The State Championship allows students from across the state to come together and demonstrate for other students, school and community persons what they know and can do with technology.

 

Over 5000 P-12 students and 1,500 adults attended and supported 2015 State Championship. Overall attendance was estimated as reaching between 8,000 and 9,000 by Rupp Arena officials.

Over 360 schools from 94 districts came to show what they know.

Hundreds of judges determined the best technology user students in Kentucky.

The 2016 STLP State Championship will return to Rupp Arena and the Lexington Convention Center on Friday, April 22, 2016.

“It isn’t just about winning – it’s about learning, helping people with projects and having a good time.”

All STLP schools are welcome to attend the State Championship to learn and achieve. There are no registration fees. All schools attending must register online- including the number of students and adults attending.

Plan to attend the whole day. If your budget allows or your school has raised the funds, you may wish to consider staying overnight before the day of the event and/or overnight the day of the event.  Some schools plan another trip in the area. (KET, Toyota, UK, Horse Park, Explorium of Lexington, etc.)

 

At State Championship schools may:

  • Talk with other students, teachers, community persons and visitors that support technology;
  • Attend student presentations in small rooms
  • Compete in any of the many live performance competitions
  • Visit playground activities provided by supporting partners in Rupp
  • Explore the many outstanding showcase projects in the large hall
  • Interact with Guess My Career
  • View best services and products
  • Attend the awards celebration

 

THREE WAYS TO PARTICIPATE AT STATE FOR ALL STLP SCHOOLS

JUST ATTEND

Any STLP School may attend/observe at the event in order to learn from demonstrating & competing students.

Registration is still required

BE INVITED

Qualifying prior to State event in showcase projects, fall and winter finalists

Invited projects will need to register to secure a table and judging time

COMPETE IN A LIVE PERFORMANCE CATEGORY

Sign up students to participate.

Students must be preregistered to enter a category at state.

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Live Performance Events & State Rubrics

REGISTRATION FOR STATE CHAMPIONSHIP
  • Every STLP group that will attend or participate in State Championship must register before the deadline using the online application.
  • Follow the link to the State Registration Portal under the “State” section of http://stlp.wpengine.com 
  • NOTE: Even invited participants must register (includes Fall Showcase qualifiers and Digital Product Online Judging qualifiers)

ALL PERFORMANCE COMPETITIONS:
  • Schools must determine which students have the best skills to represent their school in the given categories
  • Schools apply online for a competition category when they apply to attend state
  • Have as many different students apply as possible since many categories are happening at the same time
  • Directions will be given onsite for each performance category
  • Best performances by grade level groups will be recognized at the annual Award Show at the end of the day

 


LIVE PERFORMANCE CATEGORIES and RUBRICS

Click on Category Titles to access the competition rubric. Note that some categories are grade level restricted.  Review the rubric to determine if your students are eligible to compete in each category.

 Level 2 and 3 Project Rubrics/Project Planner: Carefully review the Level 2 Rubric and plan your presentation using the rubric as a guide.  Complete/fill out and bring copies of the Level 2 Project Planner to hand to judges during competition.  For convenience, all Project Rubrics and Planners are bundled into one editable packet (Level 1, 2, and 3). Editable Level 2 Project Planner (click here)

Art on Demand: one student creates an original piece of art using the prompt, theme and Photoshop/GIMP

 Bench Challenge: two students must apply; reply to questions, best scorers troubleshoot a computer onsite

 Cinemania: using a given prompt, one team creates and posts a video within 48 hours after release of specific elements. View kentuckycinemania.org for past examples and more info

 Coding Challenge: one student finds a solution to a prompt by creating a script/code

Cyber Defense: a team of students will capture flags worth points while working through a series of information security situations  STLP is looking for someone to act as competition lead for the Cyber Defense category for the 2016 State Championship.  If you have a suggestion or wish to volunteer, please contact Jeff Sebulsky at jeff.sebulsky@education.ky.gov

** UPDATED for 2016 ** Dell/MS Gaming Rubric: Minecraft : Exciting updates for the 2016 event!  Teams are challenged to build a Minecraft rendition of their school before State and submit their creation for the competition.  At the State event, Minecraft stations will be open and available for exploration (no on site competition — open for everyone to experience Minecraft).  Please, download and read the updated rubric for more info and for instructions on how to connect with the category leads for additional questions.

 EKU Aviation Challenge: one student plans a flight

 Extreme Networking: one student takes a written test and best scorers troubleshoot network issues onsite

 Flight Sim: one student answers quiz, best scorers use Flight Sim software to fly

 Geek Squad Ready: one student will generate a web page concerning a topic and interview at State  Geek Squad Ready will not be available at 2016 STLP State Championship.  We hope to see them participate again in 2017

 Georgetown College Robot Use: a robot performs a task and 1 to 2 students discuss the task of the robot

** UPDATED for 2016 **  Geotechnologies/Geospatial Literacy: one team uses GIS to find a solution to a problem.  New an exciting approach developed by partnerships between state and national mapping professionals.  This competition is state of the art and will connect student with the world of geotechnology

 Help Desk/Desktop Support Service: one team presents and markets the school/district help desk

 Heritage Council: one team creates a Main Street video

STLP Game Design Challenge: one team plans, designs and presents an original video game

KY Travel: One team creates a short video highlighting what is special about their local community

 Newscast Service: one team documents and explains the school’s news program & includes a sample video

 NKU Mobile App: one team creates a mobile application for learning or entertainment

 Photo on Demand: one student captures a photo with a given theme in a given amount of time

 Proven Learning Quick Tech Recall: one student quickly replies to general technology questions

 Racing to the Future: one student’s car will race on a slot car track for fastest speed, best design using STEM

 RCX (Robo Challenge Xtreme): the regional team winners are invited to compete for the RCX state title

 SumoBot: 1-2 students program their robot to maneuver another robot off the circular ring within a time limit

 UK Computer Science: two students, BYOD, learn a programming language onsite and complete a task4

 UK Engineering Minds On Innovation: one team creates, designs a product, idea or process that solves a problem

 UL Podcast Service Telling Your Story: one team uploads best podcast to the UL server

 Web Site Design: one student, BYOD and choice software, will design a webpage using a given prompt

 


Digital Product Rubrics (look for details about qualifying products moving from DPOJ to State_

Digital Art Product

 Documentary Product

 ePublishing Product

 Feature Video Product

 Get Certified Product

 Graphic Design Product

 KATE “School Safety Super Hero” 2016 Product

 KSU GIS/MAPS/Cartography Product

 Manipulated Image Product

 Multimedia Content Product

 Music Product

 Photo Product

 PSA Product

 Storytelling Product

 Technical Writing Product

 

Project Level 2 and Level 3 Rubrics and Project Planner

 Complete Project Information Packet (includes Level 2 and Level 3 Rubrics/Planner) (PDF)

 Editable Level 2 Project Planner

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Awards Show

ANNUAL AWARDS PROGRAM AT STATE

Rupp Arena 5:00 PM – 7:30 PM

During State Championship, students from across the state will be recognized for performance and work. The annual awards program is held at the end of the day’s activities on the Rupp Arena stage.  All students, parents, teachers and community persons are encouraged to attend. There is no cost to attend.

Ambassador award is given to an individual for his/her continual dedication to STLP at the local, district or state level.

Beth Henderson 120% Effort is given to STLP Coordinators that have shown extra effort with guiding the school’s STLP. This award is named for the late STLP Coordinator Beth Henderson of Christian County.

Champion Award is given to a CIO/TRT who has assisted the school/district STLP. Schools nominate the person.

Hall of Fame in 2015 Every three years, the Hall of Fame will be given to an outstanding graduated STLP student who is a leader. The former STLP student has given continual support to STLP after graduating. The student excels in their chosen field or career. The first Hall of Fame was given in 2012.

Live Performance Competitions  Students scoring the top first and second place in Live Performances will be recognized at the awards program.

Lydia Wells Sledge MVP The award is given by The Office of KIDS. The award honors an individual who has made significant contributions to students using technology in the state of Kentucky. These contributions must demonstrate a professional commitment in advocating progress in providing technology opportunities for students. Lydia Wells Sledge was Director of the Office of Education Technology and was an integral part of the Kentucky Education Technology System (KETS) – part of the historic landmark Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). She was instrumental in developing STLP, setting a vision for instructional uses of the KETS system, and a mentor to many educators in education technology.

 

Showcase Projects at State  The judged projects will be recognized: Best in Group, 7 Runners Up and the 4 Best in Kentucky (K-5 Division, 6-8 Division, 9-12 Division and Technical Division).

STLP Finalist Products  First and second place finalists per category per grade level will be recognized on stage.

STLP Services  All service groups will be recognized on stage.

 

How does a school know if a student is part of awards program at the end of the day? 
It takes hundreds of people to judge and determine quality for the awards program. Schools need to watch and check the WALL OF WINNERS. This section near the stage on Rupp’s floor will provide the First and Second Place students that will be called to the stage.
If a student was selected in a service group, they will be recognized on stage.
The awards program is divided into different sections of recognition: Services, Products, Human Talent, Live Competitions and Projects.

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Info for Judges

What is expected from Judges

What the Regionals Project Judge (Level 1) is expected to do:

  • Be reminded by the school to arrive and sign in on time at the event location
  • Please, try to bring an internet ready device with you to help digitally record scores (BYOD)
  • Sign in and decide a group in which to score
  • Meet the team members in the group, turn off cell phones and attend to the task
  • After a brief orientation, organize your materials and make note of judging times
  • Go on the floor and score the school at the assigned time
  • Come to consensus with your team to arrive at each school’s final score, discussing away from the school and general public
  • Record all scores for each school into a digital form (provided at judging event)
  • Go get in line as a team. All team members are to be present when turning in scores in case of questions
  • Wait in line as a team to turn in all materials before departing as a team

 

What the Semifinal Project Judge (Level 2) will do at State Championship

  • Read an email and be reminded by the school to arrive and sign in on time for Level 2 Judging, bring form
  • Decide a group in which to score by signing the School Judging List
  • (Select from elementary, middle, high school level/Community service, instructional, technical project category)
  • Meet the team members in the group, turn off cell phones and attend to the task
  • Label all rubrics in your selected group as specified by School Judging List
  • Go on the floor and score the school at the assigned time
  • Gather the school’s envelope while at the table
  • Decide the best project in your group, come to consensus with your team to arrive at each school’s final score
  • Projects must be both: score over the required minimum points and be the highest score in their group to move to Level 3 Judging.
  • Record all scores for each school on a master list as well as record scored in online format
  • Wait in line as a team to turn in all materials before departing as a team

 

What the Finals Project Judge (Level 3) will do at State Championship

  • Read an email and be reminded by the school to arrive and sign in on time for Level 3 Judging, bring form
  • Decide the group in which you will score-Projects that have been declared best in group with a score of 105 or higher will be placed in a group by school level, decide the school level in which to judge
  • Label all rubrics in your selected group as specified
  • Judge each school within the time frame with the Level 3 Rubric
  • Record all scores for each school on the rubric and on a master list
  • Continue judging to decide the Best in Regional Group, 7 Runners Up and the 3 Best in State
  • Organize the score sheets into proper school stamped envelopes -ready to be mailed
  • Wait in line as a team to turn in all materials before departing as a team

 

What the judge will do during Digital Product Online Judging (formerly know as Winter Virtual Judging):

  • Read an email and be reminded by the school to complete the virtual judging in the specified time period allotted
  • Open the email with the information about judging
  • Look for the group you have been assigned to judge; each item has a title and a URL location
  • Review Copyright and open the rubric that matches your assigned category to judge
  • Click the URL location using your web browser and find by name the item in your group list
  • Using the rubric score the item- the purpose is to decide the best piece/score among your group
  • There can be no ties so the best needs to be the highest score among your group
  • Record the scores in the electronic group sheet provide
  • Return scores on group sheet on time via email for your assigned group
  • Pieces will continue to be judged by other judges until the top best pieces are selected
  • (Example, your piece gets placed into another group until the best pieces arise. These final pieces will be invited to state.)

 

At State Championship, what areas will judges be needed?

If a school attends and just visits the event, no judge is needed and a school marks JUST ATTENDING in the online registration form.

If a school has even 1 or 75 students participating in live performance competitions or qualified with a Digital Product, the school needs to provide at least one judge.

You are always welcome to bring more judges than are required.

All judges are divided into three judging sections. Due to crowds the judges are asked to report in two time frames.

Showcase Project Judges (See above)

Presenter Judges

Other Judges (Live performance, products, services) NOTE: These times are approximate and should be used for estimates only.  Official schedules/times will be distributed directly to judges prior to the event.

  • 9:30-9:50        Sign-in Showcase Level 2 and Presenter Judges- Required
  • 10:00-10:55     Training for Showcase Level 2 and Presenter Judges ONLY
  • 10:30-11:00     ALL other category judges report to assigned area and sign in for credit to the school
  • 11:00-5:00       Judging Projects, Products, Services and Live Performance

 

What All Live Performance, Service, and Digital Product Judges will do at State Championship:

  • Since each category at State needs judges, a judge may be assigned in one of the other areas: Live performance, products, and services.
  • Read an email to see what category in which you are assigned. Review the rubric. Bring Form
  • Report and sign in by 10:30 to get your directions from the Lead Judge of that category area
  • Stay the required time. To get full credit, the school judge will need sign in and work the required time as assigned.

Judges that leave early risk the school’s project, product or service to not be scored.

 

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Selecting and Supporting Judges

Student projects, products and services are a vital part of the STLP program. Schools may participate in different levels of involvement. There are three main events that need judges: Fall Showcase, Winter Virtual Judging and State Championship. Students gain leadership and technology skills when asked to talk about what they know to someone outside the school building or display their work virtually.

Each school needs to provide judge(s) for each event in which they participate: fall showcase, winter judging and State Championship.

The majority of judges will be assigned as a Showcase Project Judge. Other adults will be asked to judge in several other areas. People that have very specific talents and expertise will be matched when possible with that area of expertise. (Example: Art judges have talent in art.)

Judges will not judge their own school.

A school needs one judge in the fall, one if the school has entered winter virtual judging and one judge for each Showcase that attends State Championship (or just one judge if school chooses to only participate in live performance events at State Championship) and help score. The same judge or several judges may help in one, two or all three events.

Projects, products or services will not be scored if a school does not have a judge. Nor will the student be allowed to enter a live performance category at State Championship if there is no judge on site.

 

How does the school decide whom to ask?

  • Has your judge scored at fall showcase, winter virtual judging or state before?
  • Can your person be trusted to evaluate other school projects, products, or services?
  • Is the person able to drive to the event?
  • How much time does the judge have to judge? (1/2 day for Fall and 1 full day for State)
  • Is the person retired and willing to put their expertise to good use?
  • Does the person have specialized expertise?
  • Does the person understand the use of technology?
  • Will your person read and reply to any emails in a prompt fashion?
  • Is the person dependable and polite?
  • Can the person work with others to record scores and get all final documents complete?
  • Will your judge keep scores and discussions to themselves?

 

The school has this responsibility:

  • Contact several persons and ask them to serve as your school’s judge at STLP events for the school year
  • You may have different judges in the Fall, Winter Virtual Judging And State, but each must meet criteria
  • Look at the list of areas online in which the judge can assist
  • List the person’s name and email when applying online
  • Remind the judge ahead of time to attend the event or to score online
  • Make a name tag for the judge to wear at Fall or State
  • Have a stand by certified judge in case of an emergency

 

What the Fall Showcase Project Judge Level 1 is expected to do:

  • Be reminded by the school to arrive and sign in on time at the event location
  • If possible, bring an internet ready device with you to help digitally record scores (BYOD)
  • Sign in and decide a group in which to score
  • Meet the team members in the group, turn off cell phones and attend to the task
  • Label all rubrics in your selected group as specified by School Judging List
  • Go on the floor and score the school at the assigned time
  • Come to consensus with your team to arrive at each school’s final score, discussing away from the school
  • Record all scores for each school into a digital form (provided at judging event)
  • Go get in line as a team.  All team members are to be present when turning in scores in case of questions
  • Wait in line as a team to turn in all materials before departing as a team

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Judge Certification

Each judge must be certified for what they are to judge at Fall Showcase, Digital Product Online Judging (formerly Winter Virtual Judging) and at State Championship.

 

Most judges will be selected for Showcase Projects. Some will judge as an expert in a content area and may judge Winter Judging. Some will be randomly selected to assist a Lead Judge at State Championship.

 

Each school that has students registered in any category needs a certified judge.

 

EXCEPTION: If a school is just attending to observe, with no students in any category, no judge is needed.

 

To become certified, the school must match their judge with one statement below when they register online to attend an event.

When applying online to attend an event, please use the pull down menu and select the one best statement that fits your judge’s qualifications. You will be requested to enter the name and email of the judge.

 

In order to match judge to a judging category, STLP Coordinators will select a category in which the person wishes to judge when entering the name of the judge on the online form. When possible, those wishes will be honored. Sometimes the number needing judges may not allow the judge to have a first choice judging assignment.

 

  

FALL SHOWCASE PROJECT JUDGES

The person needs to arrive at the fall showcase site and judge with a team of people. Bring form.

To be certified the person has the time during the day to stay for the entire judging and fulfills one criterion below:

Has judged projects at regional showcases or state in the past

Is a current or retired TIS/TRT for the school/district

Is a current or retired educator with classroom and technology knowledge

(Public, private and/or university)

Meet with a TIS/TRT or STLP coordinator to review online documents prior to event

 

 

DIGITAL PRODUCT ONLINE JUDGES (formerly “WINTER VIRTUAL JUDGES”) 

The person needs to be able to access rubrics and URL locations online so they can judge work.

To be certified the person has the time to judge and fulfills one criterion below:

Has judged products in the past

Is a current or retired TIS/TRT for the school/district

Is a current or retired educator with classroom and technology knowledge

(Public, private and/or university)

Has experience and knowledge in one of the virtual areas and can access email, a web browser

 

 

STATE CHAMPIONSHIP

The person needs to arrive at the event site and judge with a team of people. Bring form.

To be certified the person has the time during the day to stay for the entire judging and fulfills one criteria below:

Has talent to assist in any live performance area due to skill or interest

Has judged projects or presenters at regional showcases or state in the past

Is a current or retired educator with classroom and technology knowledge

(Public, private and/or university)

Meet with a TIS/TRT or STLP coordinator to review online documents prior to event

 

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